It has begun.

I’m sure the back-to-school whirlwind has started for a lot of you listening people out there. People in my house are starting on three different days…eek! We are rearranging schedules and routines are shifting. Of course, this is on top of having multiple foster children (whose cases change on a dime every ten minutes. Seriously, I have some stories to tell).

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Overview of Foster Care in the United States

While many people in the United States have heard of foster care, there are some misconceptions of what it is and how it works. I want to set some of the myths straight as well as explain what foster care is to those who are not sure.

Primarily, foster care provides temporary homes to kids whose parents cannot care for them. It may be because the child is orphaned, abandoned, neglected, abused, or have parents serving time in prison. A social worker will try to place the child with relatives. If that is not possible, then the child will be placed in a non-relative foster home.

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Five Minute Friday: Lost to be Found

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Five Minute Friday is a link-up where you free write for 5 minutes on the topic. This week’s topic is Find. Find other blogger’s interpretations here.

Five minutes is not a lot of time (and I write slow).

My 5 minute free write: (and…GO!)

Find.

The word indicates lost, missing, separation.

How can you find something unless it was not there before? So when we were lost, but now we are found in God’s family, that means we were not always there. Forget the cutesy junk about us all being God’s children and how all humans will make it to heaven. If that were so, we would never need to be found. (We would have never been missing in the first place.)

But when we were rebels, running from the very best thing, running from the loving God who created us, He came to find us.

Foster Families on Children Leaving

The fear of losing someone you love can petrify you.

People have claimed this as a reason they do not take in foster children; because it would be heart breaking to have a child leave. They are completely right. It is horribly painful, but not always the hardest part. Sometimes the most difficult thing is knowing that the child may be returning to a bad situation.

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I turned to some of my foster parent friends and asked them how they deal with foster children leaving and possibly moving to bad situations. Here is a summary of what they said:

• Foster care is not about saving the world. As much as you may try, one person cannot fix everything. It is not the foster parent’s job to decide if the biological parents are good enough. It is not the foster family’s job to go check up on the child after reunification. Foster families’ job is to love the child and advocate for them while they are in our care.

• No matter what happens after they leave our care, we know that we have made a difference in their lives for that time. They may not remember our names, but they will know what love is. In the back of their minds there will be some memory of what a family is supposed to be. The love we poured out on them will carry them farther than they could go before.

• And when they go, foster families must let go to an extent. Worrying about the child does nothing for them, but it does prevent you from caring for the next child who desperately needs you. Any bitterness has to go too, along with longing for the situation to be different. Both will eat you alive. Cry over the grief that the child will not be with you. Pray for them as they go to a situation less than ideal (prayer is the only thing that does any good anyway). Find the people who support you; lean on them during this time.

Ultimately, most foster families have this in common: they do it for the kids, not for themselves. They know they will be hurt, risk burn out, witness heart-wrenching things they can never forget. But they choose to do it anyway for kids who have no choice.

Something that gives me hope is Philippians 1:6. My grandma, a foster parent to over 150 children, shared that verse from the Bible with me when my family first began taking in foster children. It goes like this: “Being confident of this, that He who began a good work in you [read: foster child] will carry it on to completion until the day of Christ Jesus.”

This post came in response to Audrey C.’s question. Thanks Audrey

Humans too

Eeeek.

The first bits feel like a bucket of ice dumped on your head.

So it wasn’t all what I thought it was.

As the story continues to unfold, a nagging feeling creeps up the back of your neck.

Maybe they aren’t complete monsters.

The abuse they suffered. The chains and cycles and addictions they are stuck in. The beatings they deal with right now in the midst of striving to get their children back. How they never got a good chance in life.

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Waiting for strength

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Willing to Listen

It is hard in our noisy world to find someone willing to listen. It is hard to be that person, listening. And when you spend so much of your time listening to hard stories from little lips, you find yourself needing someone to listen to YOU for once.

Earlier this year I realized how much I longed to talk to someone who “got it”. I joined a couple of foster care support groups on facebook.* What a difference! In my feed I now had real questions and issues to be addressed. There were foster parents sharing encouraging stories about a kiddo’s progress. To be honest, I was just proud of the fact that I knew their abbreviations. It was like I fit right in to a secret club. 🙂

After introducing myself to the group, I got a message. It was from an editor of a foster care magazine. The editor asked if I would be willing to write an article for the magazine from the perspective of a biological child of foster parents. I jumped from my seat. Someone actually wanted to hear what I had to say? Someone was asking me to talk more about foster care???

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